Black hunger : food and the politics of U.S. identity (Book, 1999) [Alabama State University Library]
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Black hunger : food and the politics of U.S. identity

Author: Doris Witt
Publisher: New York : Oxford University Press, 1999.
Series: Race and American culture.
Edition/Format:   Print book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
"The creation of the Aunt Jemima trademark from an 1889 vaudeville performance of a play called "The Emigrant" helped codify a pervasive connection between African American women and food. In Black Hunger, Doris Witt demonstrates how this connection has operated as a central structuring dynamic of twentieth-century U.S. psychic, cultural, sociopolitical, and economic life." "Witt draws on recent work in social  Read more...
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Details

Genre/Form: History
Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Doris Witt
ISBN: 0195110625 9780195110623 9786610453351 6610453357
OCLC Number: 38732146
Description: xii, 292 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm.
Contents: pt. I. Servant Problems --
1. "Look Ma, the Real Aunt Jemima!": Consuming Identities under Capitalism --
2. Biscuits Are Being Beaten: Craig Claiborne and the Epistemology of the Kitchen Dominatrix --
pt. II. Soul Food and Black Masculinity --
3. "Eating Chitterlings Is Like Going Slumming": Soul Food and Its Discontents --
4. "Pork or Women": Purity and Danger in the Nation of Islam --
5. Of Watermelon and Men: Dick Gregory's Cloacal Continuum --
pt. III. Black Female Hunger --
6. "My Kitchen Was the World": Vertamae Smart Grosvenor's Geechee Diaspora --
7. "How Mama Started to Get Large": Eating Disorders, Fetal Rights, and Black Female Appetite --
African American Cookbooks --
Chronological Bibliography of Cookbooks by African Americans.
Series Title: Race and American culture.
Responsibility: Doris Witt.

Abstract:

The creation of the Aunt Jemima trademark from an 1889 performance of a play called "The Emigrant" helped codify a pervasive connection between African-American women and food. This work demonstrates  Read more...
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An intriguing, provocative work of psychoanalytic theory and literary criticism that seeks to reach beyond a specialized audience. * Choice *

 
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